Columbia Where are you?

February 16, 2008

 

When I started this blog, Kelli mentioned to me it might be difficult to do a whole blog based strictly on Columbia Sports. With the motivation to arise to the occasion, I stuck with it and decided to give it a shot. This week I’m in full understanding of why Kelli advised me with the necessary precautions. I truly can’t find any information worthy of promoting to the blogosphere regarding this company. I mean the fourth quarter earnings are up, but I already covered that. Well, I guess this is a call for anyone who knows anything recent to please drop me a line and leave a comment on this post. Here’s another funny video to keep readers entertained…


Reputation Management 101 – I guess Columbia’s ok

February 10, 2008

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In the world of media today, it’s more important than ever for a company to have a positive reputation. From blogging to podcasts, even the smallest issue can come back to bite a company in the butt if they don’t handle it professionally. So what’s a company to do? Take an example from Paul Dunay and his “MRO” three-step approach to reputation management.

 

1) Monitor – Companies should designate an employee or hire an external service to monitor, moderate and drive positive discussions.

2) Respond – Technical staff should be designated to respond to any product or support issues that arise from communities and take the lead in responding with action plans to any negative sentiments that develop.

3) Optimize – Companies need to proactively optimize their reputation online over time by exploiting the positive aspects of their brand (an example here is GE, whose Ecomagination is demonstrating the company’s commitment to keeping the environment clean).

So how’s Columbia doing? Well for anyone who stays up to-date with the news, they know they haven’t heard any horrible stories affiliating them with sweat shops, plummeting stock prices, or any other major business disasters. Therefore, their monitors must be doing something right.

This unfortunately leaves them nothing really to respond to. However, they do have a PR manager and specialist on staff, which allows me to believe they’re prepared just in case.

I will however give Columbia a thumbs-up for their online press room. Lately they’ve optimized their press kits to exploit the positive aspects of their brand.

 


Columbia discovers Survivorman

January 31, 2008


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As if there weren’t enough “Survivor” style reality shows, Columbia is teaming up with the Discovery Channel in hopes to brighten the horizon on their target audience and give “Survivorman” another season.

The Portland Oregon tycoon is finalizing a deal with Discovery Channel to begin advertising on the cable network by sponsoring “Survivorman” and another show yet to be determined.

Talk about Columbia planning to dive into long-term advertising deals with other established media sources such as Outside Magazine, Yahoo, The Weather Channel, Comedy Central and Playboy Magazine are also in circulation.

According to Columbia’s chief executive officer Tim Boyle, the deal with the Discovery Channel has not been finalized, but it will be the most the company has ever spent on one channel. Boyle hopes that the exposure will help Columbia reach its goal of quadrupling the number of consumers who see its name in the mass media.

“They have a tremendously loyal following of outdoor minded people and our target audience,” Boyle said. “But more importantly, it’s highly global.” Discovery Communications reaches 1.5 billion subscribers in 170 countries through many different channels such as Discovery, TLC and Animal Planet.